21 Tactics Spokespeople Use to Manage Tough Questions

We’re pretty excited to have a new contributor sharing his experience and research in the world of risk communication. Dr. Roger Miles was introduced to us via another contributor after they met while attending a course at the Harvard School of Public Health Roger teaches graduate level risk-related psychology at Cambridge University and the United […]

Crisis Identification and Management

We are in the medal round for our year-end countdown of Top 10 Most Read Pieces of 2015 here on the blog. This bronze-winning piece was inspired by my philosophy coursework at Old Dominion University (Go Monarchs!). Really! I took a philosophy course on ethics and crisis communication, so it makes sense that I’d migrate […]

Crisis Communication and the Golden Mean

Here’s a good thought experiment you can conduct from the comfort of your well-appointed office (that may or may not smell of rich mahogany), your 12 square feet of space in a cube farm, your couch or from wherever it is you are reading this post: make a list of all the times you’ve told […]

5 Things Every College Comms Major Should Hear

This spring I filled in as an affiliate professor, teaching Intro to Public Relations, at Loyola University in Baltimore. The department chair seemed sheepish at the prospect of asking someone with my experience to teach the basics to freshmen, “I understand this may be rudimentary and not very interesting for you, but we could use […]

When ethics collide: The boss vs. the profession

I spoke to a capstone public relations class at a local university last week. The future of PR is extremely bright if these men and women are a fair cross-section. They asked some great questions and made some astute observations. Today, I want to delve into one question about ethics worth sharing. Question: Where do […]

Virtuous Crisis Communications

Aristotle’s model of virtue ethics provides clear guidance on how professionals can best communicate with stakeholders during an emergency or disaster. Aristotle believed that the key to life was happiness, and that it was achieved by living virtuously – “all things in moderation,” basically, because in his treatise on the subject every virtue has TWO vices, […]